What We Stand For:

We support a Charter Amendment requiring a vote of the people before 227 low-density acres of Santa Monica Airport can be redeveloped for other purposes.

Why is this important?

The political game by those who hope to profit from redeveloping 227 acres of Santa Monica has gone on too long. Over the years, City politicians and influential special interests have frequently sought to convert the 100-year-old Santa Monica Airport to many different uses; everything from affordable housing to a transit hub has been proposed. But one thing is always the same — the schemes would increase density and traffic.

The 227 low-density acres help to protect Santa Monica from the encroaching mega-growth of the Westside. It is clear from their statements – and their actions – that the politicians can’t be trusted to maintain a low density land use. Want proof? The City’s recent approval of the large high-density Hines development completely disregarded the concerns of nearby residents and the people of Santa Monica.

It’s long past time to put any decisions to redevelop Santa Monica Airport land in the hands of the voters rather than leaving it to politicians and developers.

Did you know?



Santa Monica Airport hosts 175 businesses, employing 1,500 people. And, the airport has already instituted strict rules to reduce noise, hours of operation, and to restrict the type of aircraft allowed.

Closing the Airport would mean shutting down businesses and terminating hundreds of good family-wage jobs.

Closing the Airport would impose huge costs on the City, which means taxpayers would pay again.

We believe voters should approve future land uses at Santa Monica Airport.

Santa Monica Airport and Business Park are low density, valuable community land uses that generate business, jobs and tax revenue for the City as they have since WWII.

A decision to change the low density use at the Airport will forever alter the character of Santa Monica and the Westside.

In the event of a serious incident with the 405 or the 10 unusable or jammed, SMO would be the only local way to get emergency relief into the City.

We believe voters should approve future land uses at Santa Monica Airport.

In 1923 the site was dedicated as Clover Field named for WWI pilot Lt. Greayer Clover, who was killed in action in the war.

During WWII Douglas Aircraft operated a defense plant with 44,000 workers.

Sunset Park and other Santa Monica neighborhoods were built to provide housing for the Douglas workers.

We believe voters should approve future land uses at Santa Monica Airport.